Miller Hull

Inquiry is a foundational part of working with Miller Hull. It starts with listening to everyone involved to distill goals, priorities, dreams. Asking the right questions is critical, but just as important to a project’s outcome is listening to the answers. And our clients and project partners tell us we are great listeners. Only then do we begin to explore possibilities and develop design solutions on a shared journey of discovery to imagine and achieve the greatest potential.

 

Working Together



Achieving a successful design solution comes from building trust among project partners based on shared values. For us, enjoyment of the process is equally as important as the architectural result. Our inclusive, integrated approach respects that great ideas flow naturally from all team members–with designers, client/owner, consultants, related stakeholders and end-users each contributing to the outcome. Collaboration is not just part of our process, it is our process.

West Campus Utility Plant

Seattle, WA

This project provides chilled water and emergency power to the University of Washington’s rapidly expanding west and south campuses, cost effectively, while creating an architectural gateway to campus. The Progressive Design- Build Delivery Method (PD/B) is relatively new to Washington State and selected for this project based on the belief that it would accelerate the overall project duration required to complete the project. Chilled water services were required by a fixed date to a building already in construction. PD/B allowed a large and diverse group UW stakeholders to participate with the design-build team throughout the development of the project. Engineering needs and solutions, driven by years of campus systems experience from the Facilities representatives, were balanced with architectural and planning goals with the University Architect, while budget and scope were being constantly monitored by the Capital Projects Office. The major lessons learned:

  • Align before Design: Aligning known scope with identified budget to understand context of the challenge we were facing was critical.
  • Right team = Right Results: Process was fast, documentation was reduced, and complexity was high. Continuity of team members throughout the entire project was important.
  • Focus on what makes an Impact: 20% of the scope has 80% of the impact. Focus on what is important. Establish core design ideas that have whole-team buy-in.

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San Ysidro Land Port of Entry

San Ysidro, California

Working with GSA and the contractor, we developed a streamlined design process that took this multi-phased, $450M project from master planning to final concept in less than six months, and into the first Phase of construction within 15 months. A series of highly interactive multi-day workshops facilitated issue resolution and decision-making after which direction on design issues was compiled and distributed to the Owner team before they left—an innovative and collaborative approach praised by GSA. We also worked closely with Customs and Border Protection to develop new ways to process cars, buses and pedestrians, and maximize officer comfort in a hot, carbon monoxide-filled environment of waiting vehicles.  Unique solutions such as double stacked booths increase operational and processing efficiency, and ETFE (Ethylene tetrafluoroethylene) translucent pillows at all inspection canopies provide shade, reduce weight on the structure, and ensures optimal operational lighting conditions at all times of day.

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Odegaard Undergraduate Library & Learning Commons, University of Washington

Seattle, Washington

To satisfy State funding criteria, the renovation had to be delivered within an extremely tight timeline—while keeping the building operational 24/7. The team held a pull-planning session at the outset to collaboratively craft a project schedule reducing the typical UW project from 44+ months to less than 24 months, including a summer building closure window. A number of strategies were used: concurrent tasks, extremely early bid packages, shortened client reviews, as well as design team co-location with client and contracting teams. The group also crafted a scorecard to encourage integrated team work and a sense of shared mission in order to achieve ambitious schedule goals.

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Northwest Maritime Center

Port Townsend, Washington

60+ years as an oil off-loading terminal facility left the site with an incredibly stressed marine habitat and contaminated shoreline. Soil was removed and properly disposed of, and a new 290-foot pier replaced an existing creosote-laden structure. Pier design was researched in cooperation with local, state and federal agencies as well as marine biologists. A NOAA Habitat Restoration Grant funded research through design resulting in a new prototype for over-water structures sensitive to the marine ecosystem. The discovery process included exhaustive sun/shadow studies to determine optimum pier size and the lowest impact design, which included extending the wide ship’s berth out beyond the habitat zone and adding reflective panels to the underside of the structure to reduce shadows.

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Renton Library

Renton, Washington

The original structure, while iconic, could not be built over a river today given current environmental restrictions. Planned improvements were required to respect those restrictions by avoiding impacts to the habitat below the existing structure. With code upgrades requiring additional foundation work, our team was faced with balancing significant constraints. We creatively found a way to buttress the structure landward of the existing pilings—both streamlining the construction process and protecting sensitive habitat.

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Lions Gate Secondary Wastewater Treatment Plant

District of North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Metro Vancouver engaged an interdisciplinary team of designers, engineers, experts, staff and the public through an Integrative Design Process utilizing Whole System Thinking. Typical boundaries between disciplines were eliminated, resulting in synergies that define new conventions for infrastructure projects. Project Definition Phase discussions emphasized the potential transformational impact of desired outcomes. This included determining how a range of goals–including exemplary secondary treatment, innovative sustainable design strategies, strong community connections and integrated resource recovery–can truly be harmonized.

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Defining Opportunity



Transforming a client’s needs into an engaging, functional building is a hallmark of our design–from the simplest cabin on a cliff in the San Juan Islands–to the busiest border crossing in the world processing 50,000 cars a day.  We begin with a thorough analysis of requirements, challenges and opportunities. Then pursue a rigorous logic to achieve structures that serve our clients’ mission, within an architectural expression that provides visual clarity of concept and suited to the context of each location.

IDEA1

San Diego, California

Good Bones – An overarching goal was to create a statement building, enhancing community character and pedestrian experience now, and also supporting growth in the neighborhood over time with an adaptable design. Being the first structure in an emerging area of downtown San Diego requires it to be nimble and adaptable to evolving market conditions.  A Conditional Use Permit (CUP) allows residential units to be mixed with active commercial uses at the ground floor for up to 10 years.  Research into the anatomy of a storefront was conducted to dissect the critical proportions and fundamental elements of a retail storefront. The bones of this future condition were designed into residential unit facades including structural bay dimensions, and slab breaks to allow easy transition of use, one bay at a time.  As the building evolves with the neighborhood, its cohesive character will continue, and its mission to drive change will provide increasing incremental impact.

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Pierce County Environmental Services Building

University Place, Washington

The Steilacoom aggregate mine and processing site on the Puget Sound, south of Tacoma, was one of the largest sand and gravel operations in the United States. The site was mined for more than a hundred years, heavily transforming the local topography. The property also contains the tidal estuary of Chambers Bay, the heavily treed Chambers Creek Canyon, 2-1/2 miles of Puget Sound frontage, miles of creek frontage, and a variety of county services and operations. This project began the process of reclaiming the site, transforming seven acres on top of the bluff to a public amenity, including play fields, ponds, pedestrian trials and other amenities along with the Environmental Services Building.

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Point Roberts Land Port of Entry

Point Roberts, Washington

Recognizing that many federal buildings constructed in previous decades were lacking in appropriate civic character, the GSA Design Excellence Program has dramatically improved the design of federal buildings and citizens’ positive perception of their government.  A primary goal is working through collaborative partnerships to design and construct facilities that reflect the dignity, enterprise, vigor, and stability of the Federal government; avoid a cookie-cutter official style; and incorporate the work of living artists in public buildings.  In 1998, Point Roberts Border Station was recognized in the GSA Design Awards program as being one of a handful of projects nationally demonstrating the program’s success.

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Kitsap County Administration Building

Port Orchard, Washington

Kitsap County was renting multiple offices and using an overcrowded courthouse for administrative functions resulting in procedural and cost inefficiencies.  The first step in planning a new Administration Building was a survey of all administrative functions and spaces to determine the best allocation of uses among two existing buildings, proposed new buildings to house public functions, and City Council Chambers. A second critical step was to identify an appropriate site. A community based planning process led to selection of a site that while technically challenging, with a 45 foot grade change, was very well-located to create a centralized County identity.

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Structural & Nano Materials Engineering Building, University of California San Diego

La Jolla, California

Originally conceived of as a multi-wing facility connected by an enclosed atrium, a major design breakthrough happened as a result of the exceptionally active construction climate during which this facility was designed and materials pricing was at a premium. Given the temperate climate, it was deemed unnecessary to enclose transient activities like departmental receptions and circulation corridors that could happen outdoors. Vast expanses of curtain wall, smoke exhaust systems and make up air systems were eliminated, while a “porch roof” and “windbreak” of monumental operable glass doors protects gatherings during inclement weather. Circulation between the two wings is covered, but unconditioned, resulting in a more intimate connection to the landscape – a simple move that accomplished all of our client’s goals for a fraction of the cost.

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Northwest Maritime Center

Port Townsend, Washington

At the intersection of the Victorian town’s historic district of brick buildings and working waterfront with wood clapboard structures, the Center respects both elements while being true to its function. Rooted in the town’s rich maritime history, it borrows cues of transparency, color, and relationship to the street from the commercial core, and materiality, form, and relationship to the shoreline from the historic boat shops and sail lofts. The result is a new, yet authentic center of community life for Port Townsend.

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Vancouver Community Library

Vancouver, Washington

While libraries remain the center of many communities and a true testament to the spirit of inclusion and public access, their function is continually evolving and keeping up with technology is never-ending. Embracing the spirit of change, this library is designed with a minimal amount of “fixed” elements. Structural bays (columns) are based on modular shelving layouts and spaced as far as apart as possible to create flexible open areas that can be reorganized or subdivided over time. All collection areas, computer spaces, and meeting rooms are on raised access-flooring, enabling easy reconfiguration and even easier technology upgrades.

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Odegaard Undergraduate Library & Learning Commons, University of Washington

Seattle, Washington

Two classrooms included in the program experiment with a new model of teaching and learning space. There is no teaching station at the front—students sit in round “pods” and work together while an instructor moves between groups. Open 24 hours a day, the classrooms include sliding glass partitions and movable furniture so rooms can double as night time study space, rather than remain closed and locked.  Detailed assessments of the success of these spaces are now providing guidance for the next generation of learning spaces on campus.

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Building Consensus



Bringing a building to fruition includes cultivating financial and human capital. From agreeing on concepts, to helping garner financial backing and community enthusiasm for projects, we encourage wide-ranging input to enrich design and make it truly representative of those for which it is intended. To that end we orchestrate a decision-making process that is transparent, logical and defensible. This often involves developing materials to support fundraising campaigns, as well as making presentations to key decision-makers, donors and the community to help everyone understand and champion a project. Whether support is already in place or further alignment is required, our team ensures all project partners are involved and see the value of their contributions from day one.

Epiphany School

Seattle, Washington

Construction of a large, institutional building was of great concern to the school’s residential neighbors. Already frustrated by disruptive daily activities of student pick-up and drop-off, they were suspicious of any perceived expansion of the school, viewing school growth as increasing negative impacts to their neighborhood. Our team worked with the school board and administration to proactively lead a series of community meetings. As a result, the scale of the building was broken down to reflect the scale of neighborhood residences, and play areas within the campus were made available for neighborhood use after school hours. Artwork by a local artist was included in green space visible to neighbors. Ultimately, the process resulted in a stronger ongoing relationship between the neighborhood and the school that has lasted beyond construction.

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SPU South Transfer Station

Seattle, Washington

Although bordered by two freeways in an industrial area, the SPU South Transfer Station is also not far from a residential neighborhood. It was SPU’s desire for this facility to be a significant operational and aesthetic improvement for its South Park neighbors. A community task force was established to work with the design-build team throughout the process. Concerns expressed included traffic flows and patterns, illegal dumping as well as the impact of another, large industrial facility in the community. Design enhancements resulting from this process include visibility through the site edges to discourage illegal dumping, meeting room availability for public use, and a trail along the east edge of the site that will ultimately connect to a wider trail network being developed.

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Renton Library

Renton, Washington

The community’s deep connection to its much loved icon was a significant factor in the project’s particularly lengthy public involvement process. The design team navigated numerous lively public meetings and charrettes to explain design constraints and opportunities, while respectfully fielding citizen concerns and ideas. Successful brokering of opposing views and resolution of design challenges led to retention of the library’s original character while bringing it forward to be a flexible, adaptable and resilient community resource.

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Pike Place Market – MarketFront

Seattle, Washington

Programmatic requirements to expand Pike Place Market’s functions, character and history include additional housing, non-franchised retail and public services for homeless and low-income populations. Initially, the substantial space required to accommodate all of these desired elements seemed destined to literally overshadow the desire for a low-profile building that would protect exceptional panoramic views from the existing market—making it a non-starter in the minds of the market community. The success of the MarketFront project depended on deep and continuous stakeholder involvement and support throughout the design process.  In two years of design development and approvals process, our team participated in hundreds of public and civic meetings and working sessions with a far-ranging group of stakeholders and multiple constituencies to seek comment on design direction and development.

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Our clients expect us to re-imagine and reinvent–in a productive way.  They come to us when they have a challenge that demands a unique and functional response. We achieve transformative design by pushing the boundaries of current thought and leveraging the latest in technology, materials and cultural context. Grounded in expertise, yet fueled by bold thinking.

Designing for the Environment



Miller Hull has been at the forefront of exploring innovative site strategies and building systems since our firm was founded. In the early 1980’s we were recognized for award winning earth-sheltered, passive solar buildings designed using local construction techniques and materials. Forty years later we continue this founding tradition as we are involved with a number of Living Buildings that push the boundary of efficiency, including the recently completed Bullitt Center–the largest and first commercial certified Living Building regarded as ‘the greenest building in the world’. We continually strive for innovative sustainable approaches and technologies that push building performance to the highest level.

More demanding than conventional structures, buildings targeting net zero or net positive energy and water goals brings an added level of complexity to the design process. There is no simple solution or single best approach, making a collaborative design process critical to designing a resource-efficient building. We are practiced in mobilizing and guiding both owner and project teams to achieve ambitious energy outcomes that minimize resource consumption and minimize use of toxic materials. This results in buildings with not only exemplary energy performance and water efficiency, but that are healthier and uplifting for people.

As environmentally-minded design leaders we support industry initiatives and practices related to regionally sourced materials, product transparency, passive design strategies and reduction of carbon emissions through programs such as LEED, the International Living Future Institute’s Living Building Challenge and the AIA 2030 Commitment.

Our in-house sustainability commitments incorporate efficiency-minded business practices which includes the recent environmentally-oriented renovation of our Seattle studio targeting Living Building Petal certification. From purchasing carbon credits supporting renewable energy to completely offset the annual impact of our business footprint, to participating in the JUST social justice label—as a firm we take seriously our role in contributing to the social, cultural and ecological health of communities through design.

San Ysidro Land Port of Entry

San Ysidro, California

At San Ysidro, conservation and renewable strategies are integrated with security and operational needs, design excellence standards, and stewardship for ecology beyond project boundaries which includes the Tijuana River watershed. Sustainable goals relate to energy conservation, energy production, water reclamation, water recycling and storm water management targeting net zero for conditioned spaces, net zero for non-potable water, and providing a zero-discharge site. Sustainable features include optimized and efficient mechanical equipment, lighting and building envelopes combined with photo voltaic panels, solar thermal panels, natural ventilation and a closed loop geo-exchange system offsetting energy use. Water management strategies include low-water native plantings in bio-retention and filtration areas, and a cistern and water treatment plant for both grey and black water to reduce water use. The facility is the first and only LEED Platinum Land Port of Entry out of approximately 20+ LEED border crossings in the United States—a high achievement for a large facility fully operational, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

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Bullitt Center

Seattle, Washington

The Bullitt Center is a significant step forward in the design of high performance buildings. The audacious goal of net zero energy use was set for this six-story urban office building in cloudy Seattle. In addition to net zero energy, the project has reached the broader goal of achieving full certification under the  Living Building Challenge, which takes a holistic approach to sustainable building design.

The design for the Bullitt Center, and for any building with high performance goals, requires an integrated process—seeking to reduce energy consumption through a balanced contribution of high efficiency envelope and mechanical system, passive systems such as operable windows and exterior blinds, lighting power reductions, reductions in plug loads through technology and controls, and operational changes by building tenants.

The resulting building was designed to use as much energy as can be produced on site by a rooftop PV array:  approximately 230,000 kWh/year, for an EUI of 16 kBtu/SF. This extraordinarily low energy use is less than 20% of a typical Seattle office building. It is well below the level of any comparable North American office building and is consistent with what we know about the highest performing buildings in Europe.

Bullitt’s heating and cooling energy use only about 5% of the building’s energy use, and the biggest end uses in the proposed project are office equipment—computers, monitors, servers, printers, copiers, appliances, elevators, control systems, and other miscellaneous devices (typically called plug loads)—and electric lighting. Together, these account for almost 2/3 of the building’s energy budget. One of the reasons the building has been performing better than predicted and become a net exporter of energy is due to the rapid pace of energy efficiency improvements in all things we typically plug in.

What we also take away is that we can work collaboratively to advance the industry and culture around low-energy and net-zero buildings. We have been lucky to work with a visionary client, forward-thinking developers and other design consultants, and a contractor willing to look at different ways of doing things. We have sought advice from local, national, and international practitioners engaged in high performance buildings. We are enjoying the opportunity to see how other projects in the Northwest are approaching similar challenges. In turn, we hope some of the lessons we have learned and passed on will be useful for others.

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U.S. Embassy, Niamey, Niger

Niamey, Niger

Resource efficiency is especially critical in this part of Africa.  All wastewater is treated on site and recovered to provide 87% of the irrigation needs for the already very water efficient landscaping.  The site will also include 700 KW of photo voltaic panels, with an expected production of 1083 MWh/year—one of the largest arrays on a U.S. embassy compound.  High performance interiors also contribute to overarching eco-diplomacy goals to demonstrate sustainable strategies. It is anticipated the overall project will achieve LEED Gold certification.

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South Lake Union Discovery Center

Seattle, Washington

Presentation centers for residential developments such as this one typically have very short lifespans, disappearing when construction is complete and units are sold. The modular nature of this building enables it to serve for a much longer period of time. Sited right up to the sidewalk, the building sits lightly on the land suspended on short concrete piers. Building edges are cantilevered to allow grade and vegetation to run uninterrupted beneath. Separated at three integrated joints, the structure can be broken into modules sized for transport on city streets, to a new location where the building may resume functioning in its current capacity or be re-purposed for an entirely new use.

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LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center

Olympia, Washington

Class A reclaimed water produced at the treatment plant is water that has been used, cleaned then returned to the community for irrigation, toilet flushing, industrial and manufacturing, and other non-potable uses. Overarching benefits include wastewater and water supply management, reduced pressure on limited aquifer supplies and environmental enhancement such as wetlands restoration or stream flow augmentation. The building’s use of reclaimed water in its pond, for toilet flushing, and irrigation of two large green roofs reduces potable water use by 80 percent over a comparable baseline building.

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Mercer Island Fire Station 92

Mercer Island, Washington

Designed in the wake of the Bullitt Center, this fire station was seen as an opportunity to integrate state-of-the-art, but low cost sustainable design strategies. One of the simplest and most cost efficient ways of saving energy is to design an airtight building envelope. Lessons learned on envelope design from the Bullitt Center were applied here, resulting in a measured infiltration rate of 0.1cm/sf, a 75% reduction from code allowed levels and providing enhanced thermal comfort for the firefighters.

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Epiphany School

Seattle, Washington

With sustainability an important part of the Epiphany School’s curriculum, the school expressed interest in integrating visible and experiential sustainable strategies throughout the building and site. Classrooms are naturally ventilated with operable windows and solar fans at the top of air “chimneys” that operate when the sun is out and ventilation is desired. At the bottom of the chimneys inside classrooms, whirligigs move with the airflow indicating that fans are operational. Students actively engage in the thermal control of their classrooms by opening windows and seeing the motion of the whirligigs. Other sustainable strategies include a visible PV array, vegetated roof and school vegetable garden irrigated with rainwater collected on site.

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STREAM Building, Seattle Academy of Arts & Sciences

Seattle, Washington

An eco-charrette with students at project onset established guiding sustainability principles incorporated in this high performance building. An 11,900 gallon cistern collects rainwater from the roof to be reused for toilet flushing and landscape irrigation. Energy use is reduced by 50% from the LEED baseline and 70% from the 2030 baseline through daylighting, passive cooling, and high efficiency HVAC which includes a radiant ceiling system and VRF heat pumps. The south façade brings abundant daylight, controlled by exterior sunshades and interior automated blinds. Automated and manually operable windows promote natural ventilation and night-flush cooling throughout.

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Structural & Nano Materials Engineering Building, University of California San Diego

La Jolla, California

We were charged with developing a high performance building envelope to both decrease building cooling load and control glare in all daylit spaces. With labs almost exclusively in cooling mode, and offices that require preheating, solar gain on all glass is controlled through orientation-specific façade design. A mix of shading devices, i.e. exterior, motorized blinds and vertical fins, allow early morning gain and eliminate low west solar gain where needed. This system offsets direct visual contact with the sun and balances perceived brightness of spaces with appropriate lighting design, creating balanced illumination. The range of efficiency measures reduced building energy use by 24% more than the level prescribed in California Title 24 in place at the time.

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Kitsap County Administration Building

Port Orchard, Washington

To take full advantage of the mild Puget Sound climate and to save energy during appropriate outdoor conditions, the design eliminates the use of air handling and refrigeration equipment with fan assisted natural ventilation. Appropriate outdoor air conditions are based on a combination of outdoor air temperature and solar/internal building loads. In natural ventilation mode, north-facing operable windows can even be manually opened by occupants following email notification and a red/green light system signaling suitable conditions. Air enters through window openings and is relieved through internal louvers located near the skylights above the interior offices at the back of the floor plate. Space temperature and carbon dioxide (CO²) levels are monitored at all times and natural ventilation mode is supplemented or terminated by forced air as required.

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Miller Hull Seattle Studio Renovation

Seattle, WA

Petal certification under the International Living Future Institute’s Living Building Challenge addresses elements related to Place, Water, Energy, Health & Happiness, Materials, Equity and Beauty. As a single-floor tenant improvement project it was not possible to obtain the Net Positive Energy or Water Petals. However, we reached a significant milestone in energy savings which surpasses both 2012 and 2018 Seattle Energy code limits for offices.

While relatively modest in scale, this project has created a ripple effect. To meet the LBC Materials Red List requirement to avoid the use of 22 toxic ingredients, several manufacturers and suppliers eliminated prohibited chemicals from their products and practice, leading to re-engineered LBC Red List-compliant products as a result of this project.

PROJECT QUICK FACTS

  • New EUI: 45 (68 metric tons CO2e) 38% better than 2030 baseline
  • 88% savings in lighting electricity use
  • 25% savings in plug load electricity use
  • 22% overall savings in electricity use
  • 19% overall savings in energy use
  • Lighting power density from 1.05 watts per square foot down to around .3 watts per sf
  • Energy Star Score: 85

 

THERMAL COMFORT
Efficient heat pumps and improved distribution and reduced energy use. Office energy savings is now at 38% over the 2030 Challenge baseline.

ELECTRIC LIGHT & CONTROLS
Pre- renovation, office Energy Use Intensity (EUI) was55 kBtu/sf/year. After replacing lighting with LED’s, adding daylight and occupancy sensors controlling all new receptacles, EUI is now 45 kBtu/sf/year. The studio went from an installed lighting capacity of 15.7kW (1.05W/sf) to 3.7kW (.3 W/sf). In context of the 2030 Challenge, we have already achieved the 2025 target.

To the south, three new skylights illuminate a previously daylight-starved area giving light to a large gathering area and working spaces ensuring that all staff have access to daylight.

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Lions Gate Secondary Wastewater Treatment Plant

District of North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Lions Gate demonstrates how progressive cities can more holistically approach large-scale infrastructure. Validating that ‘once-a-century’ opportunities to incorporate clean energy and community integration strategies with treatment processes can improve the built environment and positively impact local ecologies and human health. In the context of addressing climate change challenges, water and energy issues are mutually interdependent. The collection, treatment and distribution of water/wastewater accounts for a significant percentage of total energy use–while uses that don’t require potable water comprise over 80% of potable water consumption. This proposed new facility recognizes the amenities in the waste stream–extracting energy and nutrients–while converting wastewater into valuable renewable water and energy resources.

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Pierce County Environmental Services Building

University Place, Washington

In spite of the owner’s conscious decision to not pursue LEED Certification, the team incorporated aggressive sustainable strategies and post-occupancy evaluations validate the building operates 30% more efficiently than a typical office building. The owner’s decision to reallocate funding that would have been required for LEED certification to a series of interpretive exhibits in the building and on site has had a strong impact on the people who come to the building. By demonstrating the benefits of sustainable water strategies through their own facilities, public agencies can inspire their constituents to adopt practices leading to changes in civic approach to infrastructure in the built environment.

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Communicating Ideas



Design drawings and models are invaluable tools for communicating concepts encompassing the look, feel, function and scale of a structure from conception to reality. Being facile with a wide variety of graphic tools (sketches, 2 and 3D diagrams and renderings, 4D animations, video) to convey design ideas to diverse audiences is a key strength of our team. We are also experienced in designing onsite environmental graphics that complement a structure to convey brand or essence through strong and relevant visual identifies that create a simple visual vocabulary reinforcing organizational character.

Pierce County Environmental Services Building

University Place, Washington

Introduction of natural light, interior vegetation and views to the exterior make for a more humane work environment. Space planning was designed according to a European office model, where no desk is more than 30 feet to a window. Enclosed office pods containing the individual offices and conference rooms slash through the open office “tail” of the building and define the various departments while providing visual transparency through the structure. These office pods, or “chimneys”, serve as the primary structure allowing the office interior to be virtually column-free. They also admit natural light, provide locations for interior planters, and are instrumental in the mechanical system design. A raised floor air distribution system reduces the size and energy consumption of the mechanical system, improves indoor air quality, provides for future flexibility, and gives individuals direct control of their immediate environment.

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Point Roberts Land Port of Entry

Point Roberts, Washington

On a technical level, the primary purpose of a land port of entry is to ensure the safety and security of our nation by closely monitoring individuals and goods crossing the border.  As the first point of contact many visitors have with our country, border stations also have a responsibility to be welcoming while conveying the dignity, honor and values of the United States of America.  Balancing those two goals through architecture was a design challenge solved gracefully in the Point Roberts Border Station.

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Lions Gate Secondary Wastewater Treatment Plant

District of North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

As clean water is a finite resource necessary to support life, responsible and sustainable management of water, wastewater and stormwater systems ensures future generations have safe, clean water. The proposed Lions Gate Secondary Wastewater Treatment Plant not only employs technical best practices, it incorporates experiential and interpretative opportunities in a landscaped park-like setting to build public awareness of the ecology, economics and social equity elements of its resource recovery strategies.

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Olympic College Poulsbo

Poulsbo, Washington

The community college system in Washington State provides educational opportunities through smaller branch campuses in outlying areas. This first building on a new campus is designed as a multi-use structure–a classroom, administration center,  social space, physical plant and cafeteria. It also stakes out an institutional identity. Although new buildings have been added since, this initial campus building remains the recognizable image of Olympic College in North Kitsap County.

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Renton Library

Renton, Washington

To say that power and technology needs have changed since the original library was constructed over fifty years ago is an understatement. Our team was challenged to integrate current technology and provide future flexibility, all while not disrupting the structure’s floor which is essentially a “bridge deck” over a salmon spawning bed. Our solution embraces the systems, with a network of exposed overhead conduit and cable trays, all carefully arranged to distribute power and data where needed in an artful and visually attractive way honoring the character of an information-age library.

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Vancouver Community Library

Vancouver, Washington

Replacing what was essentially a one-room library, at five-stories the new Vancouver Community Library was a much bigger facility for patrons to navigate and understand. The collection is organized around a full-height atrium space visible from the street, with circulation centralized to a heroic architectural stair with clear and simple graphics enabling visitors to immediately grasp where they want to go.

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Bob Hull – ‘A Bob Sketch’

In the office, ‘A Bob Sketch’ is a term to refer to a drawing that conveys the quintessential idea of a project. ‘A Bob Sketch’ — coined for Bob Hull’s remarkable ability and use of hand sketches — can explain a whole project in a single image, artfully balancing a level of imagination and reality accessible to clients and fellow architects.

Bob hardly spent a day when he did not draw something. He drew to make sense of things and he could “bang out,” as he used to say, a quick sketch that would give life to an idea. A design discussion with Bob could not begin without his Niji stylist pen, the medium for having a conversation. When someone couldn’t quite find the words to explain their idea, the pen would be passed as an invitation to speak through sketching.

On any given day, there is always someone in our office doing a hand sketch. And we ask all potential employees to share sketches during the interview process. In this age of computer graphics and sophisticated technical design and modeling programs, we still look to our roots and the power of simple diagrams or sketches to provide clarity during the design and discussion process internally and with our clients and project partners.

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Designing Regionally



The beauty of the Pacific Northwest has had a profound effect on our design, resulting in a body of work strongly influenced by site and environmental conditions. Our buildings are clearly modern, yet respectful of surroundings. As our design opportunities have expanded beyond the Northwest, we have taken ‘regionalism on the road” and adapted our contextually-focused design philosophy specific to new locations. Our work stands out, for the way it fits in.

Northwest Maritime Center

Port Townsend, Washington

Located where Puget Sound meets the Strait of Juan de Fuca, the site is exposed to extreme maritime influences of wind, sun, and rain. Structures are oriented with outdoor spaces on the south side to maximize solar exposure in the mild climate, while perimeter buildings shelter the outdoor spaces from prevailing, and occasionally intense, winter winds.

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156 West Superior Condominiums

Chicago, Illinois

This infill building situated on a small lot reflects the urban lifestyle expressed by the housing, bars, restaurants, and galleries populating the neighborhood where it is located. The aesthetic is firmly embedded in the Chicago steel and glass I.I.T. School.

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Pike Place Market – MarketFront

Seattle, Washington

Particularly relevant to this design were stakeholder goals to retain the unique character and feel of the existing Market.  It was important to maintain and enhance pedestrian qualities, build visual connections between the adjacent park and Elliott Bay, and to complement surrounding historic buildings. Toward these goals, the team developed a unique utilitarian architecture that differentiates new buildings from the historic. All while maintaining compatibility in massing, scale, size, granularity, and structure of the existing Market’s simple, utilitarian facades. And which includes use of authentic elements such as concrete post and beam structures and heavy timber elements found there.

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Safari Drive Condominiums

Scottsdale, Arizona

To extend residents’ enjoyment of indoor/outdoor living in a hot, arid desert climate–courtyards, broad overhangs and covered outdoor spaces create a comfortable micro-climate between the five clustered buildings.  Native plants and regionally sourced self-weathering exterior materials naturally settle the architecture into its Sonoran Desert locale.

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Once complete, a building communicates without words. The power of well-designed buildings can also contribute to human elements of health, well-being and productivity. Our highly sustainable buildings demonstrate the economic and environmental benefit that is possible through design. In the best cases, they serve as educational tools with exposed systems and interactive elements that inform and influence those who use and visit them. As designers, we tap into our clients’ core values in the imagining of new spaces that embody what matters to them.

Attending to Details



While the overarching impact of a building as a whole makes an impression, the smallest elements are often integral to how people experience a space.  We look to vernacular and contextual building traditions for inspiration so that granular moments feel familiar, intuitive and in concert with the overall concept. Down to the smallest detail, we strive for structures that honor relational geography, utilize local materials and build on traditions of regional craft wherever they are located.

The Wharf at Point Loma, America’s Cup Harbor

San Diego, California

The Wharf at Point Loma marina incorporates a materiality and aesthetic unique to the San Diego waterfront. The combination of marina and commercial space feels a working waterfront, with an honest expression of structural framing and simple forms, materials and clean details. A heavy timber structure assembled with galvanized steel fittings is borrowed from the Northwest maritime trade and adapted to San Diego’s climate and waterfront. Its open frames provide large expanses of glass for visibility and views. The warmth of the wood and the crispness of the building forms make this a popular waterfront destination for both locals and tourists.

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Bothell City Hall & Civic Center

Bothell, WA

Collaborating with Bothell’s Landmark Preservation Board during the design phase, our team chose red brick to anchor the south wall of Town Hall and the public face of City Hall.  While budget constraints precluded using brick on the upper floors of City Hall, we developed a textured color precast concrete panel system recalling the warmth and texture of brick to meet the budget and maintain visual continuity of civic buildings.

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8th & Republican Mixed-Use Development

Seattle, Washington

Strategic selection of construction systems played a big role in the financial viability of this building for the developer.  Post-tensioned concrete was chosen over wood construction for its reduced structural depth, enabling the addition of an extra floor of apartments.  Between concrete slabs, outside non-bearing walls are framed in fire-treated wood vs. light-gauge metal framing to reduce thermal bridging and the need for increased insulation to meet energy code requirements.

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Mercer Island Fire Station 92

Mercer Island, Washington

DOUBLE DUTY–Cedar slats at the main entry form a semi-permeable screen, providing the building’s main identity while limiting views to a second floor outdoor deck. On the deck behind the wood slats, firefighters retain a filtered view to the adjacent park while maintaining a degree of privacy. For pedestrians and vehicles approaching the station from east and/or west, the slats form a solid panel that provides occupant privacy. Large CNC (computer numerical control) routed ’92’ numbers ‘ identify the station and are more or less visible depending on viewing angle and lighting conditions.

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Odegaard Undergraduate Library & Learning Commons, University of Washington

Seattle, Washington

Essential to the renovation was freshening up the interior, while complementing the existing structure. The original Red Oak guardrail that wrapped the existing atrium and stair had darkened/yellowed over time and contributed to the dated “70’s” feel of the building interior. The team salvaged the rail, which was planed, milled down with minimal waste, and restained in a neutral color.  The oak pieces were then reassembled into a new railing design that wraps the stairs, visually reinforcing connections between the three levels. While the rail appears geometrically complex, it is comprised of only two standard slat sizes and a single connection detail. By moving members in and out of plane, a three-dimensional “wave” appears on both sides of the railing.

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Lease Crutcher Lewis Union Stables

Seattle, Washington

Space in a renovated former stable sets a ‘raw yet polished’ tone for this construction company office. Modern furnishings and technology are tempered by original rough-hewn timbers, brick walls and exposed utilities. A dramatic two-story open central stair and skylight anchors the space with a distinctive abstract art installation. Nails are used in the creative artwork, elevating a basic trade tool both representational of the company’s scope of work throughout the Puget Sound region and exemplifying how it takes many pieces to make a whole, just like this employee-owned company.

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Building Community



Buildings that foster community connections have a special significance in today’s increasingly digital world. We work with families, developers, non-profits and public agencies to bring people together through architecture. By creating spaces that are malleable, inviting, and expressive, individuals and groups often occupy them in surprising ways. We start by imagining ourselves as the end users—and crafting space around what humans gravitate to: natural daylight, thermal comfort, and a connection to nature.

Pierce County Environmental Services Building

University Place, Washington

The site now includes a championship-level golf course, which opened for play in 2007, was built over manufactured soils and is irrigated with treated wastewater from the Chambers Bay Wastewater Treatment Plant. The course was designed by Robert Trent Jones II–with Miller Hull designing the supporting structures–and is already recognized as one of the top links-style courses in the world. It was host to the prestigious U.S. Open golf tournament in June 2015, the only Pacific Northwest course to ever stage the U.S. Open tournament.

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Bethaday Community Learning Space, Technology Access Foundation

Seattle, Washington

Our team channeled community support into the ‘bricks and mortar’ of this facility to make capital support accessible to an audience with limited financial resources. For instance, neighborhood children painted tiles that were donated for the restrooms; a local mechanic contributed surplus fan belts the team used to create an acoustic wall screen in the board room; the local fire station gave leftover light fixtures from their own construction effort; salvaged building scraps created the stair tower exterior cladding. Our team integrated these elements, yet retained design integrity—giving TAF unexpected project resources.

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333 Dexter Mixed-Use Development

Seattle, Washington

Seattle’s Aurora/Dexter corridor represents a significant opportunity as a next-generation work location in an underutilized area that has effectively been hidden for decades.  After years of planning and concerted involvement from developers, organizations, planners, and state and local agencies, the greater South Lake Union area is on the rise as a vibrant community.  This office building and outdoor courtyard continues the wave of positive development along Dexter Avenue, setting the tone and standard for an emerging neighborhood that is transitioning from an inhospitable car-centric traffic zone to a vibrant, walkable district with green streets.

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Mesa Commons

San Diego, California

The diversity of departments, staff and services co-located within Mesa Commons creates a home for students beyond what is traditionally available on a commuter campus. Maintaining a sense of community enables students to have more interaction with each other and faculty, providing a positive and effective learning environment.

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Bothell City Hall & Civic Center

Bothell, WA

Located atop a below-grade parking garage, the elevated platform gives Council Chambers and City Hall a place of prominence within the city. As the “heart” of Bothell’s revitalized downtown, the City Hall complex creates a public town square that is a vibrant civic gathering place and portal connecting the historic downtown Main Street and park at Bothell Landing, to new developments to the north and west. The plaza incorporates a rain garden with native vegetation and captures runoff from City Hall. This dynamic space supports a range of community events including a farmer’s market and performances, balanced by the Civic Green; a soft gathering space for outdoor cinema, play, leisure and public events.

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8th & Republican Mixed-Use Development

Seattle, Washington

Setting the building back from the street at mid-block opens up a generous public courtyard, the backdrop for a neighborhood café and elevated walkway over a large stormwater garden. This big move enables the building facades to remain relatively simple and cost-effective while positively impacting the space, foregoing more expensive façade modulation typically required by the City of Seattle to discourage large blank-walls at the sidewalk level.

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Making the Invisible Visible



Much of our work is in the public realm, and as a result occupies a visible place in communities.  These buildings may be libraries or schools, they may also be utility plants or waste transfer stations.  It is our belief that utilitarian public infrastructure buildings can be elegantly designed—visible to the public they serve and aesthetic contributors to their surroundings. By considering these buildings in a different way, we’ve uncovered long term efficiencies and lower operating costs for our clients.  And in elevating the ordinary through design, we transform the function and perception of necessary public infrastructure into effective and welcome neighborhood amenities.

 

 

SPU South Transfer Station

Seattle, Washington

The ‘dump’—a high traffic and unpleasant facility containing a city’s refuse—is generally not a public facility that is celebrated, although it is probably visited by the public as often as many city halls, library or fire stations. The visibility of the site and the size of this facility did not make concealment a reasonable approach. Additionally, the City’s leading sustainable waste management practices suggested a facility honoring that leadership. Attention to landscape design dramatically improves the experience of navigating the transfer station, softening the encounter wherever possible. The power of material re-use is exemplified through a public art piece using a remnant of the neighborhood’s recently demolished and beloved South Park Bridge, and through surplus street signs from the south end of Seattle used as cladding at the administration entry.

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Willamette River Water Treatment Plant

Wilsonville, Oregon

Prior to architect and landscape design involvement, original intent called for individual plant buildings scattered throughout the site surrounded by a fence. By examining the purification process and growth capacity the site area was determined to be much larger than needed for the project. In the end, this public works site accommodates a public park and pleasing landscape, an interpretive display, and 800 foot concrete and stone “garden wall” securing the plant from the public park and neighbors. The long wall forms a backdrop for interpretive displays and for sheltered picnic areas. Also included is an administration building housing a laboratory, community meeting room and support offices. Neighborhood use of the park, trails and meeting room has been extensive, which is especially heartening as original plans made no accommodation for public amenities.

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LOTT Clean Water Alliance Regional Services Center

Olympia, Washington

The building includes a WET (Water Education Technology) Center with classroom for programs and interactive interpretive exhibits, appealing to people of all ages. The goal of the WET Center is threefold: 1) to educate customers about the wastewater treatment services that LOTT provides, 2) to illustrate the cultural importance of water in the Pacific Northwest, and 3) to inspire visitors to recognize importance of protecting natural water resources. LOTT’s $2m investment in the WET Center has already paid handsome dividends as exhibits have been an overwhelming success, raising the bar for wastewater treatment agencies throughout the country.

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Mercer Island Fire Station 92

Mercer Island, Washington

Public safety touches all of our lives. Whether it is the people serving in the justice system, or in our local police and fire departments, we rely on them to be there when we need them and tend to forget about them until we do. They provide largely invisible services that become visible only in times of greatest need. One of the goals for this building was to increase the public awareness of the importance of the facility and for it to be a more engaging, welcoming and positive presence in the community it serves.

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Lions Gate Secondary Wastewater Treatment Plant

District of North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

This project makes invisible infrastructure visible through design, open space and public art–building awareness of the treatment process while reintroducing people and beauty to an industrial zone. Founded on an exchange between knowledge, economic, ecological and social forums, the resulting plant will revitalize a currently blighted area in a prime urban location. Taking a bold approach to engage and educate the region it serves through a public design process, the facility is an urban catalyst declaring this municipality treats water with reverence.

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Inviting Curiosity



A sustainably designed building that minimizes its environmental footprint is a wonderful thing in and of itself.  For added impact, we often find ways to integrate engaging interpretive elements and interactive experiences into a building. These moments can tell the story of a client’s impact, build increased awareness or prompt shifts in individual behavior. This is particularly relevant for organizations whose institutional missions honor the environment, further education, or foster conservation and community involvement. Our efforts to put structure, systems and materials on display enables buildings to tangibly represent what is possible—even how individuals can participate—in a built environment that works with, not against, the natural world.

IDEA1

San Diego, California

New ideas welcomed throughout the design process resulted in a mix of playful and distinctive elements that define the character of this new place and uphold IDEA District principles promoting innovation and creativity. Examples include:

  • Living soffit made from thousands of air plants and firefly lighting covering the main entry to the HUB from the south.
  • Regularly updated art installations from local artists, up to 50’ in size
  • IDEA-BOX—a repurposed greenhouse elevated in the HUB event space; a multi-purpose room equipped with a 16’x 10’ smart glass movie screen able to broadcast major events to an audience below
  • Urban “Opera boxes”–projecting from a permanent scaffolding on the east side of the HUB encouraging community and participation among residents.
  • Throughout the complex, residents and guests will be greeted by curated rotating art and architectural installations from local artists.

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STREAM Building, Seattle Academy of Arts & Sciences

Seattle, Washington

Responding to changes in contemporary pedagogy incorporating both arts and sciences, formal learning environments and informal project-based workspaces within the new SAAS STREAM building facilitate problem-solving, innovation and collaboration skills. The building includes state-of-the-art science laboratory classrooms while interior surfaces accommodate a wide variety of student art. Importantly, the building is designed to support the school’s ‘culture of performance’. As the new heart of the school, vertically linked space through the communicating stair and overlooking mezzanine provide a variety of overlooks and function as informal performance space.

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Vancouver Community Library

Vancouver, Washington

The family-friendly community urged the library to create a facility that expanded program offerings for building literacy skills – both for kids and their caregivers. Our client envisioned much more than a traditional children’s area.  The third floor is dedicated to kids and tweens (teens get their own area!) and culminates in the nation’s largest ‘childrens’ museum-like’ library space developed with experts at Burgeon Group.

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Bertschi School Expansion

Seattle, Washington

This independent school educates children to become compassionate, confident, and creative learners in a global community. Visible and interactive sustainability was an institutional priority that led to a rain water harvesting system that stores roof runoff in large cisterns: one, below grade in the parking garage, and two others above grade in galvanized steel cisterns which present playful forms in recreation areas. A green roof covers the entry canopy and ‘tree-like’ photovoltaic panels are part of a renewable energy system, supplying 6.6 per cent of the buildings’ energy requirements. A weather station on the roof correlates daily conditions with energy use and production, viewed on a digital dashboard in the art gallery.

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Bullitt Center

Seattle, Washington

Educational outreach about the building’s environmental story is at the core of the Bullitt Foundation’s mission with this project. Didactic in and of itself with exposed systems on display, the Bullitt Center houses a ground floor interpretive center and hosts public tours to explain its unique characteristics. Thousands of visitors to-date include government officials, developers, design / engineering / construction professionals, students of all ages and the general public–making it a vital resource where people can learn about green building and urban sustainability that can be replicated or incorporated elsewhere.

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